You wanted to see what’s in my pantry? Here’s a full list of all the baking/cooking ingredients I buy (you can assume virtually any organic fruit and vegetable is also a staple).

I also provided links to the products online, should you want more information or desire to order them for yourself. If you have any other questions, please let me know!

    Flour

  • Buckwheat Flour – gluten-free, rich in flavonoids, high in antioxidants, high in magnesium, more of a fruit than a grain
  • Coconut Flour – gluten-free, high in protein, high in fiber, low in carbs
  • Whole Grain Spelt Flour – even better nutritionally than white spelt flour, but more hearty in flavor; high in vitamin B2, manganse, niacin, thiamin and copper—a combination that may be helpful for migraines and diabetes
  • White Spelt Flour – more refined than whole grains pelt but with many of the same health benefits; gives results in terms of taste/texture almost exactly like regular all-purpose flour
  • Whole Wheat Flour – super hearty and has distinct flavor; I hardly ever use it
  • Whole Wheat Pastry Flour – way preferable to whole wheat (in my opinion) in terms of taste, gives a better texture

    Fats

  • Coconut Oilcrazy health benefits, easy to use instead of olive oil in cooking or in place of butter in baking
  • Organic Butter – when I use butter, it’s organic, usually the store brand (365) at Whole Foods

    Sweeteners

  • Raw (Turbinado) Sugar – Made from the juice of a sugar cane plant, with nutrients and minerals (such as Phosphorus, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, and Potassium) still present
  • Sucanat (i.e., sugar cane natural) – whole cane sugar, with nothing added and nothing taken out; source of source of iron, calcium, vitamin B6, potassium and chromium.

    Liquid sweeteners

  • Pure Maple Syrup – Naturally sweet and loaded with manganese and zinc
  • Raw Honey – antimicrobial, filled with antioxidants; local raw honey is said to help allergies; has anti-cancer benefits
  • Sorghum Syrup – hard to find in Chicago, but available at local farms in Indiana and at Whole Foods groceries south of here; Loaded with health benefits.