It’s no surprise to say that I love words—especially written words. Maybe all writers feel this way. I communicate better with what I write that what I say, and, usually, I understand better what I read than what I hear. So when I read Tim’s post below, that’s what I thought: I love reading his perspective, in black and white. I also, in this case, love being reminded of the same arguments I (and he) have to rehearse regularly, to keep creating, to keep learning, to enjoy the process. The bonus is the killer chocolate blueberry pie—a sophisticated take on the classic.

Tim's Chocolate Blueberry Pie

I’m not a baker, but I baked a pretty darn good blueberry chocolate pie. One of the lessons I have been learning in life is that while I might not know how to do something, or maybe I have some interest in doing something but am not very good at it, most of the time, it is still worth doing. Sure, we could discuss how many things there are that people are interested in doing that are not worthwhile or illegal or something. That’s not what I am talking about here. I am talking about the stuff that stretches your mind and perspective. In fact this is the type of thing I have always enjoyed, but Shanna has really helped me see it even better.

Tim's Chocolate Blueberry Pie

Creating things because we are designed to be like our Creator and because it connects with us in deep ways is reason enough to try many new things, regardless of the praise or lack thereof we receive for creating. Trying new things could make us boastful because of everything we have tried, but actually it should make us humble, if we are really being honest with ourselves, because sooner or later we see our lack of ability or weakness. As humans, we are finite. We cannot do everything. We are all fitted to some things better than others, and learning that is actually good. Stay with me.

Tim's Chocolate Blueberry Pie

Doing things that we might not be best fitted for or the best at is worthwhile because it gives us new perspective, appreciation, empathy and satisfaction. We identify in new ways with the people around us when we have tried the things they’ve tried. We learn, and we open up doors of possibility previously shut in our minds. And possibility for good brings hope. That’s one of the things I love about God: All things are possible with Him. Endless possibility for good and endless hope are with Him.

Tim's Chocolate Blueberry Pie

In small ways we can experience the expanded possibility for good every day. We create, we experiment and we try new things. Whether it be trying to fix a car, paint with watercolors, build a house, make a tincture, produce a film or bake a blueberry pie. In time the lessons start to overlap and become stronger within us. The hope that is brought by the possibility for good starts to expand us—make us see with eyes that are wider and broader and more filled with love. And, as we are expanding, by God’s grace, the things that contract us and make us cold and hard and inward—like fear, doubt and worry—start to fade away.

Tim's Chocolate Blueberry Pie

So I’m not a baker but, sometimes I bake—because experimenting and trying things I haven’t mastered are the tools that open doors of possibility.




Blueberry Chocolate Pie
Makes one nine-inch pie, enough for six to eight servings

It seems to me that the combination of blueberry and chocolate does not get enough attention. We always hear about strawberries and chocolate or raspberries and chocolate, but let’s be honest—chocolate goes with just about everything, especially fruits. I have always enjoyed chocolate and blueberries together, and this pie was in mind even while we were picking blueberries. If you love strong, dark chocolate, then you might like this recipe. It is not overly sweet, and the dark chocolate melts in with the blueberry mixture. Personally, I enjoyed it most cold because after the chocolate has melted in the oven amidst the blueberries it re-hardens in the fridge and then you get nice chocolate chunks in your pie. Would also be great with homemade vanilla ice cream (I’ll get right on it)!

Ingredients:
Filling:
5 1/2 cups fresh whole blueberries
1/2 cup coconut sugar
juice of half a lemon
1 3.2-ounce dark chocolate bar, chopped roughly (we used 85% dark)
3 tablespoons of arrowroot starch/powder

Crust:
Double the crust from the grape galette recipe – one half will make the bottom crust, and one half will make the top crust.

2-3 tablespoons of yogurt or kefir for brushing on crust

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350F and butter a nine-inch pie plate.

Make the berry filling: Add two cups of the blueberries to a bowl and add the coconut sugar, lemon juice and arrowroot powder. Take a masher or large fork and mash the berries until some of the juices start to flow, and the mixture gets liquidy. All of the berries do not have to be mashed, just enough that the mixture starts to liquify. Add the chopped dark chocolate bar and the rest of the berries. Stir to coat the berries with the mixture. Set aside.

Prepare the pie crust dough: Use the recipe from the grape galette (linked to above) to create the pie dough.

First pie crust dough: Split dough in half, and roll out first half on a floured surface until it is slightly larger than your pie plate. Lay the bottom crust in the pie plate, letting the extra overhang around the edges. Add the blueberry mixture to the pie plate.

Second pie crust dough: Take the remaining half of the dough, roll it out to slightly larger than the pie plate and lay it on top of the blueberry mixture in the pie pan. Use the excess dough around the edges to create a decorative crust by trimming off anything too big, folding over the extras into a crust form and pinching together the crusts and/or using a fork to press them together.

Brush pie with yogurt or kefir, and slide in oven.

Bake at 350 for 60 to 65 minutes, until the crust is golden. Served warm, the pie is like a sophisticated, richer version of blueberry pie; served cold, it’s like blueberry pie with chocolate chunks.

Tim

Tim Mallon runs Food Loves Writing with his wife, Shanna, who launched the site back in 2008. He works as a consultant for Life Fitness Academy in Nashville. Follow Tim on Twitter @ettlt, keep up with Food Loves Writing on Facebook and stay inspired with the monthly newsletter.

This Post Has 21 Comments

  1. Kathryn

    Love the idea of this pie cold from the fridge with the chocolate chunks running through it. Blueberry and chocolate is not something that I normally put together but this makes me think that I should!

  2. Helene @ French Foodie Baby

    I just love this post, and I have struggled with feeling blocked by fear of failure in the past. There’s a French saying that goes, “Better is the enemy of good.” The obsession of “always better” can be so crippling and keep us from trying, as you express it so beautifully here. “And, as we are expanding, by God’s grace, the things that contract us and make us cold and hard and inward—like fear, doubt and worry—start to fade away.” I think this is the key to a successful life, and an ongoing life choice also, something to cultivate throughout life. I have seen people grow old with such grace because of this, or indeed contract and become cold, hard and inward, overwhelmed by fear, doubt and worry, which is terribly sad… And on a lighter note, this pie looks just scrumptious… I love the way it oozes from its crust!!

    1. Tim

      Thanks for your comment, Helene. I have definitely felt fear of failure and have been paralyzed by indecision before, and like you said, still have to let go of some of the things that keep me from trying (like an “always better” mentality).

  3. Lindsey | The Next Course

    I often think about creativity as a fundamental human capacity. I love how you articulated this: “Creating things because we are designed to be like our Creator and because it connects with us in deep ways is reason enough to try many new things”

    And I think I will have to bake this pie this weekend… it sounds perfectly delicious!!

  4. Amy

    At the moment I am searching for a new job, and it has me scrabbling to think of all the things that I am not quite the best at, but that I might like to attempt to spend my working hours doing. In my dreams I devote my working hours to creative pursuits – words and delicious treats to fill people with joy, but in reality I am just looking at creating a future where I can spend my resting hours being able to afford my creative desires.
    In my current reality I am leaving open the doors of possibility for all the career pathways I may not have considered. Come what may I have the faith that even though I may be tested, I will have the strength I need to learn and stretch my wings.
    Also, blueberries are just coming into season here in Australia (strange that we get them in winter, and you all get them in summer) and this pie will be a perfect treat for a Sunday afternoon. Thanks for sharing.

    1. Tim

      “Come what may I have the faith that even though I may be tested, I will have the strength I need to learn and stretch my wings.” — that’s it, Amy. Thanks for your comment and I hope you enjoy blueberry season!

  5. Ellyn

    I made this pie last summer and LOVED it! What a unique combination. I’m wanting to make it again this weekend, but fresh blueberries are still a bit pricey right now. Do you think it would change much if I used frozen?
    Thanks for both the recipe and the words.

    1. Tim

      Hi Ellyn,
      Thanks so much for the comment and I am glad you liked the pie! Hooray for unique combinations, haha. I think the frozen blueberries will work as well. Sometimes frozen berries can release a little more liquid so it may help to add an additional tablespoon of arrowroot or cornstarch, but it should be no problem using frozen. I have used frozen with this recipe and it worked great–I usually let mine cool so I don’t notice if it is more runny–as I love cold fruit pie, haha.

      Tim

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