Cherry Marquee Ice Cream | FoodLovesWriting.com

We ate this ice cream late Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning, amidst some of the coldest temperatures Nashville has seen this year. I was just finishing my second (but not last) bowl as Parenthood ended, crying to Tim about something Crosby said to Julia and epiphanizing about how we all have these moments where we just need an encouraging word, and then the Nashville Evening News came on. We really never watch the nightly news, mostly because the beautiful flat-screen TV my brother gave us as a wedding gift for some reason only gets three or maybe four channels (thankfully one of those channels is NBC for Parenthood and another, public broadcasting for our weekly Downton Abbey fix) and so we don’t even bother turning it on unless we have a purpose. Accordingly, my reaction to what came next might have been overly sensitized, a little like that of a few generations before us the first time a motion picture hit the screen, but nonetheless, here it is:

There in the background of our conversation on friendships and vulnerability and love, I spotted our local weatherman on the TV screen, clad in a heavy parka, broadcasting live from an area gas station, the words “STATE OF EMERGENCY” printed on the bottom of the screen. As he reported on the 30-something-degree weather and the camera zoomed in on ice on a tree, cars sailed by on the highway behind him, no traffic or problems around. Schools were closing, mostly in anticipation of some morning ice, one right after another: This county’s closed! This one too! And there in our living room, an empty bowl of ice cream on the ottoman before me, thinking of how unexpected this seemed, I began to laugh.

Cherry Marquee Ice Cream | FoodLovesWriting.com

I laughed for minutes straight. I laughed as I pushed Tim to turn back on the volume so we could listen to citizens being interviewed about wanting to rush back home. It wasn’t the fear of ice that tickled me (Lord knows, I have that, too) or the fact that respectable newspeople were giving us the play-by-play; it was the way this scene surprised me, the way it took me aback, such a contradiction not only to the way I grew up (so gipped on the snow-day front, 1990s Chicagoland children were) but also to the Tuesday night in Nashville I was currently a part of: my husband and me, cuddled up on the sofa in January, talking about heavy relationship things and eating bowls of cherry ice cream.

In other words, you could say, I reacted the same way many of you will when I tell you more about the cherry marquee ice cream in this post. It’s going to be a little unusual, potentially not the sort of thing 95% of you would try; it might even, if you’re a little like my dad while I was home over Christmas break, make you laugh. He’d walk into the kitchen while I was working and ask, “What are you making?” a smile already on his face. And it wouldn’t matter what I’d tell him in response: chocolate banana pudding cakes (from this brilliant book), soaked pizza dough, cherry chocolate chip cookies—every time, he would laugh, I suspect because he often wonders to himself what this daughter of his has gone and become.

New, surprising ideas do funny things to us: they can be scary or strange, jaw-dropping or ridiculous. Other times, they’re funny—Why not? Who couldn’t use a little more humor in their life.

Tim's Cherry Marquee Ice Cream | FoodLovesWriting.com

So first, the name: cherry marquee. It points at the 1/2 cup organic dark cherries in the ingredients but not at some of the other, more important ones—like raw goat’s milk, for example, which has been our dairy of choice lately, partly because we have a great local provider and partly because it’s a little easier to digest and has protein sizes more similar to human milk. (As a bonus, it also doesn’t taste at all goaty like I expected.) You could easily swap this out with raw cow’s milk or organic whole cow’s milk or whatever milk you prefer.

Also, it’s sweetened with maple syrup instead of cane sugar; if you know Tim, you know how much he loves this. It contains a raw egg, which, as Tamar Adler says, is not something we’re concerned with since we know where our eggs come from, but if the idea makes you uncomfortable, no judgment here. Last but not least, it’s highly adaptable in terms of mix-ins: we’ve made it both with chopped chocolate and cherries and with coconut and walnuts.

The first time Tim made this was last summer, a more obviously appropriate time but not necessarily a better one. I mean, when I had my third (or fourth?) bowl on Wednesday, the only thing funny, at least if you ask me, was the thought of spending an entire winter boxed in to soups and stews and baked goods, without it or any other ice cream around.

Here’s my New Idea: Ice cream for everybody! Who’s in?

Cherry Marquee Ice Cream
Makes a little over a quart

As you may remember from earlier posts if not the hints in this above one, Tim is and always has been the ice cream maker in our house, so the below recipe is not only his, but also written in his words.

I love this man.

Ingredients:
Scant 1 cup of organic, Grade B maple syrup (or sorghum syrup)
Approximately 5 ounces organic dark cherries
1 cup raw pastured goat milk + an additional 1-2 cups to make mixture 1 quart
1-2 teaspoons almond extract (depending on how much you like it)
1 pastured egg

Optional add-ins:
- organic dark chocolate, chopped
- organic shredded coconut
- walnuts, chopped
- whatever floats your boat

Directions:
I like this recipe because it is versatile and the syrup is mineral rich and provides a wonderful consistency that keeps the ice cream from becoming too hard when frozen. To start, it is best to have a blender that will finely incorporate the cherries and syrup together. Add the maple syrup to the blender with half of the cherries and 1/2 to 1 cup of the goat milk (whatever you need to ensure a good blend).

Blend on high until the cherries are completely broken down (a Vitamix really breaks them down well!). You may need to stop the blender and restart to ensure that the syrup, cherries and milk are well incorporated. Then add 1 pastured egg and almond extract, and fill the container with enough goat milk to make one whole quart of mixture. Blend on the lowest setting until fully incorporated.

Add mixture to ice cream maker and process according to your machine’s time frame. I usually add the mix-ins (including the other half of the cherries, chopped up) about 5 to 10 minutes before the ice cream is done.

Shanna Mallon started Food Loves Writing back in 2008, as a way to remember her grandma and write about her life through food. Since then it's become a place leading her to a lifestyle of eating whole foods, a new home in Nashville and the love of her life, Tim. Follow Shanna on Twitter @foodloves, keep up with Food Loves Writing on Facebook and stay inspired with the monthly newsletter.

This Post Has 24 Comments

  1. Jacqui

    I would’ve laughed, too. Oh, those silly Tennesseeans. Although, the winter up here has been very mild this year — cold, but not freeze-your-nose-hairs cold (I know you know what I mean), with not a single snow flake that has stuck long enough to even consider it “real snow.” It’s kind of weird and sad and awesome all at the same time. I’m worried that it’s all going to come in March.

    Also, I really need an ice cream maker. And a waffle iron. Which has nothing to do with this post, I know, except waffles have been on my mind lately, don’t ask me why. Happy Friday!

    1. Shanna Mallon

      ahahaha!

      the very reference of “freeze-your-nose-hairs-cold” sends shivers down my spine. Oh, do I remember! Mostly, I remember telling you, and anyone else who would listen to me, how much I hated it, haha.

      And you SO need an ice cream maker. And a waffle iron! We just passed a shop last night that my brother is famous for its ice cream on waffles and I was like, brilliant!

  2. Lan | angry asian

    February 2nd is Ice Cream for Breakfast Day. don’t miss out! we’re already planning the celebration with friends.

    have you seen the jimmy kimmel video of how LA is reacting to their 50degree weather? it’s hilarious.

  3. Ruthy

    I’m there with ya on all points- ice cream cravings in January, heavy conversations with the husband that started by being overly invested in a TV show, and thinking, “bless your heart” to those who worry about cold weather needlessly (from Northern Michigan, and i always feel like saying, “oh honey, you dont *know* cold weather!”)
    Just got an ice cream maker a few months ago and always looking for reasons to use it, cant wait to try this one!

  4. sarah kate branine

    Of course I want to try this ice-cream, but can I just tell you how happy I am to hear that you don’t think goat’s milk tastes goaty. (!) I have been so nervous to try it. When I was first pregnant with Job, we were invited over to a friend’s house and they served a dish with goat’s milk. Now, I have to admit, when I am first pregnant, eating is not a fun past-time. All I can say is that I audibly gagged and had to admit to my friend that I was pregnant– even though we hadn’t told anyone yet!– because I knew if I didn’t I would surely hurt her feelings by gagging on what would normally be very good food. And, well, ever since then I’ve shied away from anything goat related. But this post gives me hope! (And a craving for ice-cream!)

    1. Shanna Mallon

      Sarah, Feel totally vindicated because, traditionally speaking, goat’s milk is super gamey. I love goat cheese but goat milk? Um, not so sure. HOWEVER, the way a milk tastes is directly linked to what the animal eats, so pastured goat’s milk is going to taste better. Also, raw goat’s milk is very different from pasteurized. I am not kidding when I say that the milk we get tastes just like normal milk and I’d be shocked if you could tell the difference! Wish you lived around here so we could have you over to try some. We wouldn’t be offended if you still weren’t into it, haha! : )

  5. Rachel

    I think you just gave me a reason to buy a new ice cream maker! We moved this summer, and amid opening boxes of kitchen items I noticed a clear “goo” all over the contents of one box… come to find out that “goo” was the insides of the ice cream maker that had cracked down the side. :/ This looks heavenly, and refreshing! I love the idea of the goat’s milk! I am already cataloging recipes for this summer and this is another to add to the list!

  6. jacquie

    i keep saying i need to get an ice cream maker and this recipe is certainly adds to that thought. any suggestions for a good one – though it needs to be very economically priced also ….. and i think that is the whole problem w/ my getting it – just not being able to afford it. but one does need to dream doesn’t one????

    stay warm :)

  7. Kathryn

    I love the juxtaposition of these little moments in life, they really form the fabric of our experiences and yes, we should laugh at them and embrace it. A lovely little recipe, cherries are a big favourite in our house.

  8. Erin

    The schools closed here in Huntsville, too. And of course they let out in the middle of the day at the exact wrong time. The snow was magical too.
    Also–ahhh Parenthood. I haven’t watched last weeks episode yet, but as usual it sounds like tissues will be necessary.

  9. Pingback: How to Make Homemade Almond Milk » Food Loves Writing / Real Food Recipes

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